Medical Foundation Employee Katie Williams Represents Indiana at Special Olympics

For the vast majority of people, there is nothing easy about losing weight.  After all, if it was easy, there wouldn’t be “miracle” diet drugs, cellulite cream, bariatric surgeries and companies such as Jenny Craig or Weight Watchers.
Instead, losing weight the safe and healthy way, includes exercising and watching the amount of calories consumed each day.

For the six people who began the Healthy Me! Program last April, it’s been a whirlwind of changes, mostly for the better. 

Because there isn’t such a thing as a “one size fits all” type of diet, they’ve worked individually with physicians from Family Medicine of South Bend, Registered Dietitian Erin Hurst from Saint Joseph Regional Medical Center and Jonell Witkowski and Dave Woods at Memorial Health and Lifestyle Center.
They’ve discussed portion size, appropriate times to fuel the body and when to taper off eating, the best cardio exercises and exercises for toning various muscles.

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July is National Hemochromatosis screening month

July is National Hemochromatosis screening month

Some people have too much iron in their blood which is called Hemochromatosis.  July is national Hemochromatosis screening and awareness month. 

Hemochromatosis affects both men and women and can affect people of all ages.  However, men are more prone to experience Hemochromatosis and usually notice symptoms in their 50s-60s, while women are typically diagnosed in their 60s.  The iron overload disease is also the most common genetic disease in the United States and typically impacts Caucasians. 

When the body absorbs too much iron from foods that have been eaten, the excess iron is stored in the organs, especially the liver, heart and pancreas.  The excess iron can harm your internal organs and can lead to cancer, arrhythmias and cirrhosis. 

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Take the Test; Take Control

Take the Test; Take Control

Did you know that Friday, June 27th is National HIV testing day?

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is urging people to “Take the Test; Take Control.” According to the CDC, black women, more than any other women in the United States are getting HIV. Of all the women in the United States, 66% are African American and 87% of these women got HIV from unprotected sex with a man. 

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) occurs when the body is unable to clear the virus as it does with common flu viruses.  Once you get HIV, you have it for life, because it attacks your CD4 cells or T-cells.  These cells are responsible for helping the body fight against disease and infection. Once HIV weakens and destroys your cells, it weakens the immune system. 
Without treatment, a person with HIV can develop Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).  AIDS is the final stage of HIV. 

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